Keeping Them Hooked – Research Opportunity

A PhD studentship is being offered at the University of Northumbria, for a research project into the use of volunteers in public libraries. This is a fully funded opportunity and will add to the rather limited research in this area.

What it study might eventually reveal around the sustainability and quality of the volunteer service model remains to be seen but it is an important area that requires a more disciplined and academic approach to gathering and presenting the evidence, which is why I have agreed to highlight the opportunity.

On a personal note I undertook my postgrad in librarianship at Northumbria University. Not only is it a great Library School but Newcastle is wonderful place to study so good luck to the successful candidate.

Keeping them hooked: An investigation into the drivers and barriers to successful volunteer use in Public Libraries

Project Description

Volunteers have become a crucial part of public library delivery within the UK, such that between 2010 and 2016 a quarter of all UK library jobs disappeared, 343 libraries closed, and 15,500 volunteers were recruited (Wainwright 2016). This increasingly mixed delivery of public libraries is part of a more general shift to reduce the role of the state in providing services, and therefore move towards the Conservative Government’s vision of a shared society. Wallace (2013) suggests that we are currently experiencing a dramatic shift from a welfare state to an ‘enabling state’, providing opportunities for the development of new relationships between citizens, communities and public services, however this results in challenges with regard to social inclusivity and fairness.

The use of volunteers to enhance the work of public librarians is not a new concept, however their increasing utilisation as a solution for financial austerity, has resulted in the development of a series of ‘unintended consequences’ that impact on delivery of a user centred public library service (Casselden 2016). Key issues relate to the capacity for social exclusion of the wider community, arising from the existence of key social groups involved with volunteering, reduced service accountability and quality, and a blurring of boundaries between the professional paid staff and volunteers (Casselden 2017). The delivery of an equitable, consistently high quality public library service requires careful thought regarding the sustainability and inclusiveness of the volunteering effort. Therefore adopting a volunteer relationship management approach (similar to ‘customer relationship management’ used in marketing) may enhance communication, build trust and relationships between existing stakeholders, and serve to mitigate some of the key challenges that exist (Casselden 2017). This also provides a base from which to develop digital solutions that would further enhance volunteer sustainability, and inclusivity to more marginalised social groups.

The Libraries Taskforce (2017) proposes that further research is required examining the longer-term impact on volunteers and the communities that they serve, in addition to exploring good practice evident in other sectors. Therefore, this research seeks to investigate and identify the key drivers and barriers to successful volunteer use, and explore more fully the mechanisms that would enhance relationships. It will also explore the ways in which digital technology might best work to support development of these relationships. A case study approach will be utilised, exploring a range of community managed libraries and their immediate community users, in addition to the third sector, and museums. A qualitative method will enable the creation of a rich picture that therefore provides an evidence base for policy development, the creation of technological solutions, and the sharing of good practice and strategies for success in creating a joined-up inclusive UK public library service.

Eligibility and How to Apply:

Please note eligibility requirement:
• Academic excellence of the proposed student i.e. 2:1 (or equivalent GPA from non-UK universities [preference for 1st class honours]); or a Masters (preference for Merit or above); or APEL evidence of substantial practitioner achievement.
• Appropriate IELTS score, if required.
• Applicants cannot apply for this funding if currently engaged in Doctoral study at Northumbria or elsewhere.

For further details of how to apply, entry requirements and the application form, see:
https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/research/postgraduate-research-degrees/how-to-apply/

Please note: Applications that do not include a research proposal of approximately 1,000 words (not a copy of the advert), or that do not include the advert reference (e.g. RDF18/…) will not be considered.

Deadline for applications: 28th January 2018

Start Date: 1st October 2018

Northumbria University takes pride in, and values, the quality and diversity of our staff. We welcome applications from all members of the community. The University holds an Athena SWAN Bronze award in recognition of our commitment to improving employment practices for the advancement of gender equality and is a member of the Euraxess network, which delivers information and support to professional researchers.

Funding Notes

The studentship includes a full stipend, paid for three years at RCUK rates (for 2017/18, this is £14,553 pa) and fees.

References

Libraries Taskforce. (2017) Corporate report: Libraries Taskforce: future research priorities. Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/libraries-taskforce-research-programme/libraries-taskforce-future-research-priorities.

Wainwright D, Bradshaw P, Sherlock P, et al. (2016) Libraries lose a quarter of staff as hundreds close. Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-35707956.

Wallace J. (2013) The rise of the enabling state: A review of policy and evidence across the UK and Ireland. Available at: https://www.carnegieuktrust.org.uk/carnegieuktrust/wp-content/uploads/sites/64/2016/02/pub14550114991.pdf.

Casselden B, Pickard A, Walton G, McLeod J. (2017) ‘Keeping the doors open in an age of austerity? Qualitative analysis of stakeholder views on volunteers in public libraries’. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. ISSN 0961-0006 (In Press)

Casselden B, Walton G, Pickard A, McLeod J. (2017) ‘Issues of quality and professionalism of library volunteers: reporting from a qualitative case study’. Performance Measurement and Metrics, 18 (2). pp. 118-126. ISSN 1467-8047

Casselden B, Pickard A, Walton G. (2017) The challenges of delivering a public library service using volunteers: a qualitative investigation examining key stakeholder experiences. In: 2017 Voluntary Sector and Volunteering Research Conference, 7th – 8th September 2017, Nottingham.

Casselden B. (2016) A Delicate Balancing Act: an investigation of volunteer use and stakeholder perspectives in public libraries. Doctoral thesis, Northumbria University.

Casselden B, Pickard A, McLeod J. (2015) ‘The challenges facing public libraries in the Big Society: The role of volunteers, and the issues that surround their use in England’. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science, 47 (3). pp. 187-203. ISSN 0961-0006

Casselden B. (2013) The challenges facing public libraries in the Big Society: focusing on the role of volunteers, and the issues that surround their use. In: Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP) Umbrella 2013 Conference and Exhibition, 2-3 July 2013, Manchester, UK.

Casselden B. (2016) A Delicate Balancing Act: an investigation of volunteer use and stakeholder perspectives in public libraries. i-School, Department of Computer and Information Sciences. Northumbria University.

Casselden B, Pickard A, Walton G, McLeod J. (2017) ‘Keeping the doors open in an age of austerity? Qualitative analysis of stakeholder views on volunteers in public libraries’. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science. ISSN 0961-0006 (In Press)

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