Connecting Students with Technology in the School Library

The third in a series of posts on school libraries is from Lucas Maxwell, school librarian at Glenthorne High School, Surrey. Lucas highlights the effective use of technology to enhance the student experience and challenge the apathy many students feel towards reading both for pleasure and educational purposes.

Connecting Students with Technology in the School Library

In the school library I manage, I use educational technology on a daily basis. My hope is that it will connect students to their favourite books, authors and other students around the world with similar tastes and interests. Over the past few years I have identified some effective ways to use technology in the school library. These tools have been very effective in the war against boredom, apathy and line every school librarian hears: “I hate reading.”

Skype
Skype has been an amazing tool and we use it in several different ways. One way is to bring authors from around the world into the library. Most authors will Skype with your library for free, so it’s worth taking the time to seek them out. Many of the books our students love are written by authors living in the United States and getting them on a plane to visit would be almost impossible. However, using Skype we can bring them straight to our door for no cost. It’s a good idea to have students prepare questions in advance and to promote the author’s books heavily before the visit. This will ensure a much more enjoyable experience for all.

We also take part in several Mystery Skypes every year. We bring in Geography classes to Skype with other classes around the world, asking Yes or No questions to try and determine where they are in the world. It combines both new and old technology as students use the library’s geography collection along with iPads to try to narrow down the other school’s location. I also appoint student leaders to organise and collect the information gathered about the other schools. It’s a great way to put leadership in the hands of the students and to create a memorable experience where students get to know other parts of the world.

 

World Read Aloud is also another great use of Skype. Our Year 7 and 8 students read picture books to four and five year old students in the United States. Last school year we took part in several of these and they were some of my favourite programs.

Twitter
Twitter has been a huge asset to my own professional development but our students also use it to connect to their favourite authors. Every month our students take over the Library’s Twitter account to ask an author a series of questions. We attach #booklingschat to every question because our book club call themselves The Booklings. This is a completely student-lead program with our Student Library Assistants taking the lead, organising and typing the questions that we project on a large screen for everyone to see. We have had some amazing discussions about writing advice, surviving high school and of course tons of recommended reads!

Padlet
Our students love Padlet. We use it primarily to connect with other book clubs around the world. We recently shared our favourite book recommendations with a class in Colorado and in Scotland. In Padlet, you create a “Wall” where students can add text, images and videos. As an administrator, you are sent an alert whenever a new post arrives. You can also protect your wall with a password that only you and the other book clubs can access. I have also used Padlet to allow students to recommend books that the library should purchase and our Manga Club has used to it to share their artwork with others. The best part is that Padlet is updated in real time so you can instantly see what your students are adding to the wall.

 

Nearpod
Nearpod allows you to create fully interactive library lessons for your students. We have used Nearpod to teach students digital literacy skills. One feature of Nearpod allows you to pose a question to your students. Using its interface you can monitor which students have responded and what they have written. After all responses have been submitted you can share a student’s response with the entire class. Whether on tablets or computer screens, all students using Nearpod are viewing the same thing. Students also have the option to dra

FlipGrid
I cannot recommend Flipgrid enough, it’s a video discussion forum that is perfect for school libraries. Administrators can create their own space on Flipgrid (called a Grid). Within each Grid you can create a topic of your choice. Students can then respond to the topic by recording 90-second videos. We have used Flipgrid to share facts about our hometowns and cities with places around the world, recommend our favourite books and also as a Mystery Flipgrid where we provide hints with other groups as to where we are in the world. Just like the Mystery Skype, we try to guess where in the world they are. In the future, we plan to use Flipgrid to connect with experts in different professions to assist our eleven and twelve-year-old students with various research projects. For more information on Flipgrid and libraries, Librarian John Iona has published a great article in the School Librarian magazine.

I’d love to hear about your favourite ed-tech tools and how you use them to connect your students with others?

(Lucas can be found on Twitter @lucasjmaxwell )

School Librarians and Why Our Children Need Them

This is the second in a series of five articles about the importance of school libraries. Elizabeth Hutchinson is Head of the Schools’ Library Service, Guernsey, and a strong advocate that access to a good school library is a right of every child.

In the following post Elizabeth argues strongly for the role a professional school librarian and the positive benefit it can bring to schools, teachers and most importantly students.

 

School Librarians and Why Our Children Need Them

I offered to write this to raise awareness of the importance of school librarians, which may seem a bit strange as the head of a Schools’ Library Service (SLS) where we are the only professional librarian support on our Island of Guernsey. It may seem that I am trying to do myself out of a job but that is not the case.

Even where schools do have a full-time professional school librarian the support from an SLS can save schools money and be invaluable. I feel that if schools understand the role of the school librarian they will also begin to understand what is on offer from SLS’s too benefiting schools, teachers and most importantly their students.

The relationship between teachers and the school librarian is a special one. The best schools are those who have school librarians, where the Head teacher has employed them for the very fact that they are qualified. Providing a specialist who can help embed research skills and support literacy development across the curriculum. These schools have Senior Leadership Teams where teachers are expected to work with the librarian when they are planning any kind of research or where the focus is on literacy.

From using the school library for books or online resources, teaching digital and information literacy, supporting literacy intervention to encouraging reading for pleasure these schools understand the benefit of collaboration for their student. This relationship leads a better understanding of the needs of the teacher and students, which in turn leads to time saved, better quality resources and students who are independent learners.

These nurtured relationships also lead to collaborations that is not immediately associated with the school librarian such as help to organise international collaborations, attending parents evening to support students and parents outside school, create makerspaces, help with coding and yes, librarians still have time to run book clubs, reading initiatives and as Barbara said in her last post, also be there for that child who needs a quiet space and someone to talk to at lunchtime.

In the last year alone librarians from SLS have co-taught from reception to 6th form. We have planned schemes of work and curated the right resources for our students. Our librarians have connected our students with students from America, Mexico and India and have plans for many more. We have increased the use of online resources through teaching in the classrooms, we have taught referencing and copyright to e-safety lessons helping to engage students in critical thinking and independent study.

We have brought authors and experts into the classrooms and with the support of our public library run numerous events from Carnegie and Greenaway lunches to Non-fiction November and World book day quizzes bring students from different school together to celebrate books and supporting literacy. We have run training sessions for teachers, created reading lists, written blog posts, attended parents evenings and generally spent time raising awareness of the importance of school libraries to a child’s education and the world of work. However, none of this would be happening if our teachers and schools did not understand the librarian’s role in teaching and learning.

If every Head Teacher, Senior Leadership Team member and teacher understood that this is what happens when librarians are engaged and supported the benefits to their students would increase seven fold. Schools need access to qualified librarians and Head Teachers need to understand why it is important.

Over the years as school budgets were cut the school librarian was commonly the first person to go. When schools started to use the Internet many thought that school librarians were no longer essential and books were no longer important as there was another way for children to get all the information they needed. They did not realise that an important skill set that was currently being taught was at risk of being lost and was going to be needed more than ever.

Now whilst I agree the opportunity to find information has become quicker it is also essential to teach our students the skills to assess, evaluate and find good quality information. Schools who no longer have a school librarian do not have this skill set available to them and we risk having a world of people who don’t have time or understand the importance of making sure that the information they read is correct. Unfortunately, teachers who have grown up where they as children were not taught or had the opportunity to use a school library do not always understand the need for them and along with that do not have the skill set to teach their students these essential research skills.

What can teachers do?

Your starting point is the school librarian. Go and find out what books are in the library for the subject you teach. Arrange a meeting with the librarian and talk about what your curriculum topics are and find out if there is any budget left to order more. What else do you need to ask?

• Does the library have any online resources that can support your topic?
• Can the librarian help you search these resources and explain how the citation tool works?
• Do they have any tools to teach referencing?
• Are they willing to teach your students these skills?
• Can they help you with global collaborations?
• Are there any online tools that they have used that would be useful for you to know about?
• Do you have any reading lists for my year group or topic? If not can you make one for me?
• Is there a book club for students/teachers?
• Little Jonny (not his real name) is not performing well do you know how much he reads? Can you help to find a book he might enjoy?

Students the message to you is simple. Go to the school library, if you read you will do better in school.

Parents, the last message is for you. Go and find out if your school has a good library and a qualified librarian. If not then ask them why. Your children deserve the best and this is the perfect place to start.

Cilip VP Election – Rita Marcella

This post is written by Rita Marcella, one of the two candidates for Cilip Vice-President. I asked each candidate the same five questions with the opportunity for an opening and closing statement. The questions reflect my own interests as a public librarian but are hopefully also relevant for the wider profession as well as campaigners. 

The successful candidate will be elected Vice-President and “…will become CILIP President in 2018. The Vice-President and President are honorary roles and their duties include being an ambassador and spokesperson for CILIP.” 

Many thanks to Rita for sharing her views.  

Details on how to vote can be found at: Elections for the CILIP Board and for Vice-President 

rita-marcellaAbout me

I have been a librarian since my early twenties when I first went to work in a university library after graduating with my Diploma in Information and Library Studies. After having my first child I became an academic teaching cataloguing and classification, user studies and bibliographic and reference work. My research and teaching interests have varied far and wide over the years and I honestly believe that there is not an aspect of library and information service that I have not reflected upon over that time.

However, despite varied interests and work with public library services, advisory services and special libraries in government and business, my chief personal research interest has always remained that of supporting the library and information user to access the information they need to help them in every aspect of their everyday lives. I like to look at the issue from both sides: from that of the information service provider and of the information service user, understanding the motivations, context and challenges of both.

Over the last 15 years as Dean of a business faculty my focus has been on interaction with industry and management of resources, both of which have given me keen insights into the challenges facing organisations in both the public and private sectors. I have also been involved in numerous charities and non-exec boards, in particular in work to enhance equity and diversity.

1. What is the core message of your manifesto?

I feel passionate about the value of library and information service and about our profession – I believe that the enabled access that we in the profession provide is critical to people’s lives in a huge number of ways and I would appreciate the opportunity in the role of Vice President to support the profession in maximising the impact of that message.

We need to provide more tangible evidence of the ways in which access to information and knowledge empowers individuals, organisations and societies. It is my view that there has been a steady erosion of the funding of, investment in and commitment to libraries and information service support in all kinds of spheres in the three decades of my career and that this erosion has been mirrored in academia, where our discipline has found itself swamped by an organisational incorporation into ‘bigger’ disciplines to the detriment of the subject. I’d like to bring the whole profession – practitioners, academics and those entering the profession together to assemble the evidence of the impact of libraries and information in an even stronger way. Through CILIP we have the base of professional partnership on which to make that work.

2. If elected what is the one area you would like to see CILIP tackle?

I should like CILIP to tackle the notion of empowerment through information both by celebrating the successes and illustrating the impact of information access but also by exploring further the ways in which people, organisations and societies can be disadvantaged through not having access to relevant, reliable and robust information. This is very much in line with my own chief focus in so much of my work but I believe that it is an agenda that it is at the heart of what CILIP is seeking to achieve.

3. What would you like to see the Taskforce’s Ambitions document contain?

I’d like a clear action plan on assembly of evidence and its powerful communication. I think that all of us who are involved in LIS understand and believe passionately in the vital role that libraries and information services play at every stage and in every context. What we have perhaps been less good at doing is having a targeted strategy for how to tackle the attitude that allow us to be packaged up as something that is ‘nice to have’ in good times but under threat at others. Strengthening and reinforcing powerful advocacy and building on work CILIP has already done is crucial.

My own particular contribution to the debate whether or not I am successful in this election will be to develop our understanding of how access to libraries and information more generally enables people and in particular disadvantaged groups to overcome barriers to success and exclusion from society.

4. In your opinion are public and school libraries facing a crisis or opportunity? 

As ever there are no threats without opportunities – that is an accepted truism in business practice. The threat is real and has resulted in the erosion I describe above – and not just in public and school libraries, but in every kind of library and information service imaginable. But the opportunities are there too: indeed arguably too many opportunities. For another truism in management is that if you have 83 priorities, you’ll fail: if you have one or two you have a far greater chance of success. And one of the ways in which the profession and academia needs to work together is on identifying and focusing on the most high value opportunities, the biggest wins – is that the extent to which libraries and information services support the health of our economy? That’s a big ticket item for sure.

5. What is your opinion of the My Library By Right Campaign & did you sign the petition?

I agree that all of society should have free and equal rights to information through libraries and other forms of provision and I support the My Library by Right, as I did the American Library Association’s Declaration for the Right to Libraries. I was very happy to sign the petition and wish the campaign every success. It is it seems to me a fact that LIS professional communities across the globe share the same set of common values about libraries and information and we need to work together through IFLA and other fora to drive forward such campaigns.

My final thoughts

Standing in the election for Vice President of CILIP has given me a very welcome opportunity to reflect back over a career spent working in Library and Information Science, a career of researching information use and need amongst citizens, business, decision makers in government and so on – but also a career of recruiting young people into the profession and preparing them for a career in library and information service. Those 35 years have seen many changes but ultimately at their core the library and information professional is dedicated to excellent service to people, to organisations and to society. We have a huge amount to celebrate in that but some messages to convey to policy makers about how and why that is important.

I want to conclude by saying that while I would be honoured if given the opportunity to take on the role of Vice President of CILIP, I will not be downcast if I am not successful for having read the post of my fellow candidate in the hustings, Ayub Khan, that I completely support everything that he says.

Access & Choice: the importance of libraries

The following guest post is from Barbara Band, immediate past President of Cilip and Head of Library & Resources at Emmbrook School in Wokingham with 1,200+ students aged 11 to 18 years. Barbara has been a school librarian for over 22 years and believes vehemently in the value of libraries. She was also the driving force behind the successful Mass Lobby in support of School Libraries.

candypic_lobby_group

School librarians make a vital contribution in the school system towards teaching and learning, as well as helping children develop information skills and improve literacy, the subject of Barbara’s post.

In the fight to protect public libraries sometimes it is easy to forget that our colleagues in other areas; schools, FE, HE are also fighting their own battles against funding cuts. I would like to thank Barbara for reminding us of the vital importance of school libraries and the work they do in improving children’s life opportunities.

Further details of Cilip’s advocacy work for schools can be found here as well as the SHOUT ABOUT campaign

Access & Choice 

If you’re reading this blog then it’s fairly safe to assume that you are interested in libraries and also that you are aware of the sorry state of affairs regarding public libraries; the decimation of a service that used to be the envy of many other countries, the erosion of a vital community facility that provides value above and beyond its costs. You’re probably also aware that I’m a professional librarian and am passionate about the benefits of libraries to the whole community. I have always been an avid library user and still am, visiting my local library around three times a month for various reasons – and yes, I do have one and recognise that I’m luckier than many.

Much has been written about what libraries do – other than issue books – and about the value-added that professional librarians bring to the service so I’m not going to repeat that here. What I’d like to do is question how various current literacy initiatives do not recognise the role that libraries and librarians can have in their agenda.

For a developed country, the UK has appalling low literacy levels. One in five children aged 11 years cannot read at the expected level and this figure increases to one in three in disadvantaged areas. Children with low literacy levels will grow into adults with literacy problems, they do not just suddenly become able to read and understand text. This will impact on their job prospects, their health and well-being and, by default, have an economic impact that affects everyone.

The government recognises this is a problem and many organisations have set up initiatives to deal with it. The latest of these is the Read On Get On campaign to tackle early language and reading skills which seems eminently sensible; if a child does not develop a range of verbal skills then they are unlikely to learn to read well, and if they cannot read then they are unlikely to be able to write. There are many other initiatives and I am not going to list them here but what they all have in common is the failure to acknowledge the huge role libraries can play in improving literacy.

Early years’ language and reading skills are a good place to start but throwing everything at nurseries is not going to work because that precludes children who do not attend them, for whatever reason – and there are many that don’t. You also need to start earlier, when that child is a baby and listening to sounds. So where can all parents and children have exposure to professional expertise to help them develop these skills – maybe the public library could help? Many already run baby rhyme and story time sessions that are incredibly popular, it would be fairly easy to expand the programme to include a range of other relevant activities and reach the local community.

Teaching children how to read is one thing but if you want them to develop into higher level readers with the accompanying literacy skills then you need to engender a love of reading because then they will choose to read, rather than read because they have to. Reading programmes have their place but do not work with everyone.

Books in classrooms can help but it is unlikely that every classroom will have a wide enough range of both fiction and non-fiction books to appeal to every type of reader. And without a knowledgeable professional to select stock and guide children, you are likely to end up with a strange random collection. Some teachers may be aware of what is published but many of them are not, they are focused on their subject; for librarians, books and resources are our tools, regardless of the format, subject or level.

Access and choice – those are the key words when it comes to engendering a love of reading and improving literacy. Schools and communities without libraries have neither.

Barbara Band